Discussion:
OT: Need a Chili Recipe
(too old to reply)
CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 17:46:28 UTC
Permalink
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.

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Freddy A.
2005-01-31 17:57:40 UTC
Permalink
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of alt.food you
recgroup faggot?
CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 18:03:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of alt.food you
recgroup faggot?
So, are you saying you don't have a chili recipe for me?

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ecr72
2005-01-31 18:19:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by CincinnatiKid
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of alt.food you
recgroup faggot?
So, are you saying you don't have a chili recipe for me?
When I saw that you responded, I knew it would be good. No recipe here,
but thanks for the laugh this morning you 'recgroup faggot'. I wonder
what he thinks of people who post using recpoker.

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CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 18:40:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by ecr72
Post by CincinnatiKid
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of alt.food
you
Post by CincinnatiKid
Post by Freddy A.
recgroup faggot?
So, are you saying you don't have a chili recipe for me?
When I saw that you responded, I knew it would be good. No recipe here,
but thanks for the laugh this morning you 'recgroup faggot'. I wonder
what he thinks of people who post using recpoker.
I aim to please

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Sup Bro
2005-01-31 18:10:25 UTC
Permalink
4 pounds coarsely ground sirloin
Olive oil or butter
2 cans (6 ounces each) tomato paste, thinned with water
3 to 4 medium onions, chopped, about 3 cups
1 green bell pepper, chopped, about 3/4 cup
2 to 10 cloves of garlic, minced (or to taste)
3 tablespoons commercial chili powder, or more to taste
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
In a 4-quart pot, cook meat in a little olive oil or butter (or a blend of
the two) until no longer pink. Drain excess fat. Add remaining ingredients
and simmer 2 to 3 hours with the lid on. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of alt.food you
recgroup faggot?
_______________________________________________________________
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Sup Bro
2005-01-31 18:12:51 UTC
Permalink
Note: Working with jalapeños or other chiles: Capsaicin is the ingredient
in chiles that causes the burning sensation associated with fresh peppers.
It's a good idea to use rubber gloves when handling fresh chiles.  If you
choose not to use gloves, be extremely careful not to touch any part of
your body, especially your penis or eyes.2 pounds round steak, diced
1 pound ground pork
5 cups chopped onions
1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic cloves
7 tablespoons chili powder
2 green chili peppers, seeded and chopped (see note)
3 (15-ounce) cans whole tomatoes
3 tablespoons tomato paste
4 bay leaves
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon packed brown sugar
2 (15-ounce) cans kidney beans
1 pound corn chips for accompaniment
Shredded cheddar cheese for accompaniment In a large, heavy kettle, brown
diced round steak and ground pork with onions and garlic; drain. Stir in
chili powder, green chili peppers, canned whole tomatoes, tomato paste,
bay leaves, salt, oregano, red wine vinegar, and brown sugar. Cover and
cook for 2 hours over low heat. Add kidney beans and cook, uncovered, for
30 minutes. Serve with corn chips and grated cheddar cheese. Makes 12
servings.
Post by Sup Bro
4 pounds coarsely ground sirloin
Olive oil or butter
2 cans (6 ounces each) tomato paste, thinned with water
3 to 4 medium onions, chopped, about 3 cups
1 green bell pepper, chopped, about 3/4 cup
2 to 10 cloves of garlic, minced (or to taste)
3 tablespoons commercial chili powder, or more to taste
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
In a 4-quart pot, cook meat in a little olive oil or butter (or a blend of
the two) until no longer pink. Drain excess fat. Add remaining
ingredients
and simmer 2 to 3 hours with the lid on. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of
alt.food
you
recgroup faggot?
_______________________________________________________________
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CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 18:17:54 UTC
Permalink
TY, Sup Bro.
Post by Sup Bro
Note: Working with jalapeños or other chiles: Capsaicin is the ingredient
in chiles that causes the burning sensation associated with fresh peppers.
It's a good idea to use rubber gloves when handling fresh chiles.  If you
choose not to use gloves, be extremely careful not to touch any part of
your body, especially your penis or eyes.2 pounds round steak, diced
1 pound ground pork
5 cups chopped onions
1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic cloves
7 tablespoons chili powder
2 green chili peppers, seeded and chopped (see note)
3 (15-ounce) cans whole tomatoes
3 tablespoons tomato paste
4 bay leaves
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon packed brown sugar
2 (15-ounce) cans kidney beans
1 pound corn chips for accompaniment
Shredded cheddar cheese for accompaniment In a large, heavy kettle, brown
diced round steak and ground pork with onions and garlic; drain. Stir in
chili powder, green chili peppers, canned whole tomatoes, tomato paste,
bay leaves, salt, oregano, red wine vinegar, and brown sugar. Cover and
cook for 2 hours over low heat. Add kidney beans and cook, uncovered, for
30 minutes. Serve with corn chips and grated cheddar cheese. Makes 12
servings.
Post by Sup Bro
4 pounds coarsely ground sirloin
Olive oil or butter
2 cans (6 ounces each) tomato paste, thinned with water
3 to 4 medium onions, chopped, about 3 cups
1 green bell pepper, chopped, about 3/4 cup
2 to 10 cloves of garlic, minced (or to taste)
3 tablespoons commercial chili powder, or more to taste
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
In a 4-quart pot, cook meat in a little olive oil or butter (or a blend of
the two) until no longer pink. Drain excess fat. Add remaining ingredients
and simmer 2 to 3 hours with the lid on. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Post by Freddy A.
See what I mean? Take this shit to another forum. Ever hear of
alt.food
you
recgroup faggot?
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Thermos
2005-02-03 15:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by CincinnatiKid
TY, Sup Bro.
Not sure if you were talking about "Cincinnati Chili" (given your
alias), but the thread made me wonder - isn't there a specific style of
chili in Cincy that uses a can of beer? I always knew of Chili with
beer in it as being referred to as Cincinatti Style. A decent bottle
of lager seems to add a nice flavor to a pot of good chili. I also for
some reason recall that people there sometimes serve chili on spaghetti
- is that right?
CincinnatiKid
2005-02-03 15:38:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thermos
Post by CincinnatiKid
TY, Sup Bro.
Not sure if you were talking about "Cincinnati Chili" (given your
alias), but the thread made me wonder - isn't there a specific style of
chili in Cincy that uses a can of beer? I always knew of Chili with
beer in it as being referred to as Cincinatti Style. A decent bottle
of lager seems to add a nice flavor to a pot of good chili. I also for
some reason recall that people there sometimes serve chili on spaghetti
- is that right?
Yes, chili spaghetti and chili dogs are very popular here.....especially
the chili spaghetti which you can't really find in most places. I'm not
sure about the berr though.....the chili on the spaghetti is pretty
runny...

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Jacksnfive
2005-02-03 23:32:47 UTC
Permalink
Note: Working with jalapeños or other chiles: Capsaicin is the
ingredient
in chiles that causes the burning sensation associated with fresh
peppers.
It's a good idea to use rubber gloves when handling fresh chiles. If
you
choose not to use gloves, be extremely careful not to touch any part of

your body, especially your penis or eyes

Why would you touch your penis while in the middle of making chile? I
mean I can understand touching your penis while playing poker, driving,
actually in most circumstances, but when cooking? I'm not sure I get
that.
Post by CincinnatiKid
Post by Thermos
Post by CincinnatiKid
TY, Sup Bro.
Not sure if you were talking about "Cincinnati Chili" (given your
alias), but the thread made me wonder - isn't there a specific style of
chili in Cincy that uses a can of beer? I always knew of Chili with
beer in it as being referred to as Cincinatti Style. A decent bottle
of lager seems to add a nice flavor to a pot of good chili. I also for
some reason recall that people there sometimes serve chili on spaghetti
- is that right?
Yes, chili spaghetti and chili dogs are very popular
here.....especially
Post by CincinnatiKid
the chili spaghetti which you can't really find in most places. I'm not
sure about the berr though.....the chili on the spaghetti is pretty
runny...
--------
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ContactGSW
2005-02-04 00:16:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jacksnfive
Why would you touch your penis while in the middle of making chile? I
mean I can understand touching your penis while playing poker, driving,
actually in most circumstances, but when cooking? I'm not sure I get
that.
I used to cook and shuck in a dive oyster bar, I occasionally had to
urinate, I washed my hands before and after. When I was a kid my parents
had a big Mex-Tex theme party, I took care of the jaloenos, from a big
gallon can, with about 1/8 inch of greasey stuff on the surface. About an
hour after this I rubbed my eyes, pretty funny now, but being blind and in
pain for a half hour wasn't too funny then, for me at least, my brothers
and sisters thought it was hilarious.


'I feel strongly both ways'
ContactGSW

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Peg Smith
2005-02-03 18:53:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thermos
I also for
some reason recall that people there sometimes serve chili on spaghetti
- is that right?
Chili served on spaghetti or macaroni is one of life's greatest
pleasures.

Peg
Thermos
2005-02-03 19:04:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peg Smith
Post by Thermos
I also for
some reason recall that people there sometimes serve chili on
spaghetti
Post by Peg Smith
Post by Thermos
- is that right?
Chili served on spaghetti or macaroni is one of life's greatest
pleasures.
This thread has me considering chili for SB Sunday, although the Pats
are undefeated in playoff games where I've made meatball subs. May be
best not to tamper with that. I'd hate to be responsible for that kind
of impact.
Raider Fan
2005-02-03 20:52:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thermos
This thread has me considering chili for SB Sunday, although the Pats
are undefeated in playoff games where I've made meatball subs. May be
best not to tamper with that. I'd hate to be responsible for that kind
of impact.
You should make the switch then. You don't want to ruin your perfect
record for the subs.

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Thermos
2005-02-03 22:26:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raider Fan
Post by Thermos
This thread has me considering chili for SB Sunday, although the Pats
are undefeated in playoff games where I've made meatball subs. May be
best not to tamper with that. I'd hate to be responsible for that kind
of impact.
You should make the switch then. You don't want to ruin your perfect
record for the subs.
I sense Residual Tuck Rule Hostility. Let go of your anger. Or, if
you'd rather, I'll take your wager. You can't honestly believe its
more likely than not that the Patriots will lose. I give Philly more
credit than most Pats fans, but I still expect the better team to win.
The Pats played a tougher schedule more convincingly this season. No
reason to expect the wheels to fall off now.
Raider Fan
2005-02-03 22:38:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thermos
I sense Residual Tuck Rule Hostility. Let go of your anger. Or, if
you'd rather, I'll take your wager. You can't honestly believe its
more likely than not that the Patriots will lose. I give Philly more
credit than most Pats fans, but I still expect the better team to win.
The Pats played a tougher schedule more convincingly this season. No
reason to expect the wheels to fall off now.
It could be some leftover hostility from the biggest screwing in NFL
playoff history. Regardless, I already put my money where my mouth is. I
took Philly on the money line for +225.

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TBohms
2005-02-03 23:12:47 UTC
Permalink
Excellent
Thermos
2005-02-04 00:34:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raider Fan
Post by Thermos
I sense Residual Tuck Rule Hostility. Let go of your anger. Or, if
you'd rather, I'll take your wager. You can't honestly believe its
more likely than not that the Patriots will lose. I give Philly more
credit than most Pats fans, but I still expect the better team to win.
The Pats played a tougher schedule more convincingly this season. No
reason to expect the wheels to fall off now.
It could be some leftover hostility from the biggest screwing in NFL
playoff history. Regardless, I already put my money where my mouth is. I
took Philly on the money line for +225.
I continue to be amused by that reaction, but I won't dredge up that history again. Some
people still think the earth is flat, too.
Raider Fan
2005-01-31 21:25:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sup Bro
4 pounds coarsely ground sirloin
Olive oil or butter
2 cans (6 ounces each) tomato paste, thinned with water
3 to 4 medium onions, chopped, about 3 cups
1 green bell pepper, chopped, about 3/4 cup
2 to 10 cloves of garlic, minced (or to taste)
3 tablespoons commercial chili powder, or more to taste
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
In a 4-quart pot, cook meat in a little olive oil or butter (or a blend of
the two) until no longer pink. Drain excess fat. Add remaining ingredients
and simmer 2 to 3 hours with the lid on. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Sounds good, but YOU FORGOT THE BEANS!!!

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RedKnave
2005-01-31 19:51:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
I can give you one for $8,000.

No, wait. That comes after I eat your chili.

Sorry

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CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 19:57:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by RedKnave
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
I can give you one for $8,000.
No, wait. That comes after I eat your chili.
Sorry
I was waiting for this reference. Well done.

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Roy MacPherson
2005-01-31 21:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
Get out your food processor and crock pot.

I usually cook to taste, but besides your tomato base (I usually use a
few 8oz tomato paste cans--the little ones--and two or three diced
tomatos), meat, optional beans---I've heard that true chili does not
have beans, but I like a Pinto/Black bean combo myself---and
chili-fixins (you can usually get those over the counter and they're
not too bad), my key ingredients are:

Fresh jalapeno peppers, habanero chilis, those little red chilis that I
can't remember what they're called but are available in the mexican
foods section of your local grocer, onions, cilantro and cayenne
pepper. If you're daring, throw a clove of garlic in as well.

I usually mix the tomato paste, water, chili-fixins, cilantro, peppers
and a wee-but of salt into the food processor and blend it until it the
peppers are minced. You can taste it periodically to see if you need
to add more peppers. While tasting, you won't have a full-bodied
flavor to work with, so it takes a bit of imagination to guess how it
will taste after it's been cooked. As a general rule, I usually use
3-4 full jalapenos per 8oz tomato paste. The more potent peppers you
have to be careful with, unless you're me, then the more the better.
Once you're satisfied, add your cayenne pepper and mix it in. The
cayenne pepper should add some heat to the chili spice mixture, but the
taste should reside just behind it in flavor...It should compliment the
chili mix, not overpower it. Generally, I use a spoonful of cayenne
for every 6 spoons of chili mix (or thereabouts).

Out of the food processor, the color should be a burnt brown color, not
red, with lots of little green specks (jalapenos) and white specks
(onion) mixed throughout. Your red peppers should blend into the
color.

Then, I throw everything into a crock-pot and cook it overnight on low.

The next day, I turn off the heat, put some sugar in it (not a lot) and
pour in about an 8oz cup of tequila, stir it well and let it sit for
the day.

Then, about two hours before meal time, I crank the crock-pot up to
high and bring it to a bubbling boil and serve. It's a little harsh on
the first day, but it gets smoother the next day.

One of the keys, though, is you don't want it to be too soupy. I like
my chili to be somewhat firm, so throw in some masa flour if it's too
soupy. Use only a spoonful at a time because a little masa goes a long
way.

If you don't have a food processor, you can mince your peppers with a
grater, but wear gloves! You will get burned from the juices (and make
sure those juices get put in the mixture, too). And, whatever you do,
DO NOT RUB YOUR EYES! (Been there, done that).

If you don't have a crock pot, you can bake it in an oven crock for the
same effect. I usually shoot for about 350 degrees for a good 2-3
hours or so. Again, it's a taste thing. Some people prefer it to be
cooked on the stove in a pot, but I prefer baking as it boils the water
off nicely.

Anyway, this is a start. Try it, be creative, and find out what works
for you. Always remember, you can't fuck up chili, so don't worry.

---Roy
CincinnatiKid
2005-01-31 21:23:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy MacPherson
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
Get out your food processor and crock pot.
I usually cook to taste, but besides your tomato base (I usually use a
few 8oz tomato paste cans--the little ones--and two or three diced
tomatos), meat, optional beans---I've heard that true chili does not
have beans, but I like a Pinto/Black bean combo myself---and
chili-fixins (you can usually get those over the counter and they're
Fresh jalapeno peppers, habanero chilis, those little red chilis that I
can't remember what they're called but are available in the mexican
foods section of your local grocer, onions, cilantro and cayenne
pepper. If you're daring, throw a clove of garlic in as well.
I usually mix the tomato paste, water, chili-fixins, cilantro, peppers
and a wee-but of salt into the food processor and blend it until it the
peppers are minced. You can taste it periodically to see if you need
to add more peppers. While tasting, you won't have a full-bodied
flavor to work with, so it takes a bit of imagination to guess how it
will taste after it's been cooked. As a general rule, I usually use
3-4 full jalapenos per 8oz tomato paste. The more potent peppers you
have to be careful with, unless you're me, then the more the better.
Once you're satisfied, add your cayenne pepper and mix it in. The
cayenne pepper should add some heat to the chili spice mixture, but the
taste should reside just behind it in flavor...It should compliment the
chili mix, not overpower it. Generally, I use a spoonful of cayenne
for every 6 spoons of chili mix (or thereabouts).
Out of the food processor, the color should be a burnt brown color, not
red, with lots of little green specks (jalapenos) and white specks
(onion) mixed throughout. Your red peppers should blend into the
color.
Then, I throw everything into a crock-pot and cook it overnight on low.
The next day, I turn off the heat, put some sugar in it (not a lot) and
pour in about an 8oz cup of tequila, stir it well and let it sit for
the day.
Then, about two hours before meal time, I crank the crock-pot up to
high and bring it to a bubbling boil and serve. It's a little harsh on
the first day, but it gets smoother the next day.
One of the keys, though, is you don't want it to be too soupy. I like
my chili to be somewhat firm, so throw in some masa flour if it's too
soupy. Use only a spoonful at a time because a little masa goes a long
way.
If you don't have a food processor, you can mince your peppers with a
grater, but wear gloves! You will get burned from the juices (and make
sure those juices get put in the mixture, too). And, whatever you do,
DO NOT RUB YOUR EYES! (Been there, done that).
If you don't have a crock pot, you can bake it in an oven crock for the
same effect. I usually shoot for about 350 degrees for a good 2-3
hours or so. Again, it's a taste thing. Some people prefer it to be
cooked on the stove in a pot, but I prefer baking as it boils the water
off nicely.
Anyway, this is a start. Try it, be creative, and find out what works
for you. Always remember, you can't fuck up chili, so don't worry.
---Roy
TY, Roy. My wife is gonna cook the "Weak" Chili and I'm in charge of the
"Mans's Chili."

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HoldEmTex
2005-02-01 02:04:18 UTC
Permalink
In article , CincinnatiKid
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
Get out your food processor and crock pot.
I usually cook to taste, but besides your tomato base (I usually use a
few 8oz tomato paste cans--the little ones--and two or three diced
tomatos), meat, optional beans---I've heard that true chili does not
have beans, but I like a Pinto/Black bean combo myself---and
chili-fixins (you can usually get those over the counter and they're
Fresh jalapeno peppers, habanero chilis, those little red chilis that I
can't remember what they're called but are available in the mexican
foods section of your local grocer, onions, cilantro and cayenne
pepper. If you're daring, throw a clove of garlic in as well.
I usually mix the tomato paste, water, chili-fixins, cilantro, peppers
and a wee-but of salt into the food processor and blend it until it the
peppers are minced. You can taste it periodically to see if you need
to add more peppers. While tasting, you won't have a full-bodied
flavor to work with, so it takes a bit of imagination to guess how it
will taste after it's been cooked. As a general rule, I usually use
3-4 full jalapenos per 8oz tomato paste. The more potent peppers you
have to be careful with, unless you're me, then the more the better.
Once you're satisfied, add your cayenne pepper and mix it in. The
cayenne pepper should add some heat to the chili spice mixture, but the
taste should reside just behind it in flavor...It should compliment the
chili mix, not overpower it. Generally, I use a spoonful of cayenne
for every 6 spoons of chili mix (or thereabouts).
Out of the food processor, the color should be a burnt brown color, not
red, with lots of little green specks (jalapenos) and white specks
(onion) mixed throughout. Your red peppers should blend into the
color.
Then, I throw everything into a crock-pot and cook it overnight on low.
The next day, I turn off the heat, put some sugar in it (not a lot) and
pour in about an 8oz cup of tequila, stir it well and let it sit for
the day.
Then, about two hours before meal time, I crank the crock-pot up to
high and bring it to a bubbling boil and serve. It's a little harsh on
the first day, but it gets smoother the next day.
One of the keys, though, is you don't want it to be too soupy. I like
my chili to be somewhat firm, so throw in some masa flour if it's too
soupy. Use only a spoonful at a time because a little masa goes a long
way.
If you don't have a food processor, you can mince your peppers with a
grater, but wear gloves! You will get burned from the juices (and make
sure those juices get put in the mixture, too). And, whatever you do,
DO NOT RUB YOUR EYES! (Been there, done that).
If you don't have a crock pot, you can bake it in an oven crock for the
same effect. I usually shoot for about 350 degrees for a good 2-3
hours or so. Again, it's a taste thing. Some people prefer it to be
cooked on the stove in a pot, but I prefer baking as it boils the water
off nicely.
Anyway, this is a start. Try it, be creative, and find out what works
for you. Always remember, you can't fuck up chili, so don't worry.
---Roy
Of course you can fuck up chili. And the best way to start fucking it up
is by adding beans.

_______________________________________________________________
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Roy MacPherson
2005-02-01 12:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by HoldEmTex
Of course you can fuck up chili. And the best way to start fucking it up
is by adding beans.
Ahhh....But I did say "beans optional." And qualified it, too.

---Roy
User3247
2005-02-02 11:31:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy MacPherson
Get out your food processor and crock pot.
I usually cook to taste, but besides your tomato base (I usually use a
few 8oz tomato paste cans--the little ones--and two or three diced
tomatos), meat, optional beans---I've heard that true chili does not
have beans, but I like a Pinto/Black bean combo myself---and
chili-fixins (you can usually get those over the counter and they're
Fresh jalapeno peppers, habanero chilis, those little red chilis that
I can't remember what they're called but are available in the mexican
foods section of your local grocer, onions, cilantro and cayenne
pepper. If you're daring, throw a clove of garlic in as well.
After adding three types of chilies, one of them the hottest son's a
bitches on the planet, plus cayenne pepper, you have the nerve to say "if
you're daring" when talking about garlic?!?
Roy MacPherson
2005-02-02 21:43:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by User3247
After adding three types of chilies, one of them the hottest son's a
bitches on the planet, plus cayenne pepper, you have the nerve to say "if
you're daring" when talking about garlic?!?
Haha....You got me there!

But, I personally don't think garlic works well in chili. That's just
me, and why I mentioned it as "daring." But I know others who like it,
so go for it.

I must say, though, one guy in this thread mentioned putting 2-10!
cloves of garlic. I had to laugh at that because it reminded me of the
first time I dabbled in pasta sauce. Working from a recipe, it called
for 2 cloves of chopped garlic...Not knowing what a "clove" was,
specifically, I proceeded to chop two full bulbs of garlic. Looking at
the mountain of chopped garlic I'd created, I felt some fear, but said
"WTF, the recipe says so, so who am I to question it?" So, in the pot
it went. I let it cook overnight and couldn't wait until the next
morning to do the first taste test. Lifting the cover off the crock
pot was a little bit like a grenade going off...Blew me across the
room.

All attempts to weaken it by dilution were futile. The meat was
permeated with garlic. It was awful.

We barbecued some steaks for dinner that night instead.

---Roy
CincinnatiKid
2005-02-02 21:52:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy MacPherson
Post by User3247
After adding three types of chilies, one of them the hottest son's a
bitches on the planet, plus cayenne pepper, you have the nerve to say "if
you're daring" when talking about garlic?!?
Haha....You got me there!
But, I personally don't think garlic works well in chili. That's just
me, and why I mentioned it as "daring." But I know others who like it,
so go for it.
I must say, though, one guy in this thread mentioned putting 2-10!
cloves of garlic. I had to laugh at that because it reminded me of the
first time I dabbled in pasta sauce. Working from a recipe, it called
for 2 cloves of chopped garlic...Not knowing what a "clove" was,
specifically, I proceeded to chop two full bulbs of garlic. Looking at
the mountain of chopped garlic I'd created, I felt some fear, but said
"WTF, the recipe says so, so who am I to question it?" So, in the pot
it went. I let it cook overnight and couldn't wait until the next
morning to do the first taste test. Lifting the cover off the crock
pot was a little bit like a grenade going off...Blew me across the
room.
All attempts to weaken it by dilution were futile. The meat was
permeated with garlic. It was awful.
We barbecued some steaks for dinner that night instead.
---Roy
Damn...I thought he meant bulbs too. That woulda been interesting....

I'll let everyone know how it went on Sunday

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User3247
2005-02-03 01:41:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy MacPherson
Post by User3247
After adding three types of chilies, one of them the hottest son's a
bitches on the planet, plus cayenne pepper, you have the nerve to say
"if you're daring" when talking about garlic?!?
Haha....You got me there!
But, I personally don't think garlic works well in chili. That's just
me, and why I mentioned it as "daring." But I know others who like
it, so go for it.
Ok, I understand your point. I like a little bit of garlic, one clove
finely chopped in my 6 qt. dutch oven full is enough. You don't want to
overpower the flavor of the meat, but a small bit gives it just that
little something. As far as chilies go, I personally use a mix of fresh
jalepeno and poblano chilies, along with cayenne pepper, then for a
little of that "cooked over a camp fire" flavor, I'll add a few finely
chopped chipotle peppers. I prefer the canned ones, because you can also
add a bit of the adobo sauce to fire it up even more. It gives your
chili just a tiny bit of smoky flavor, which is a nice change of pace
from what you usually find. For thickening I also prefer masa, but if
you don't have that and you're in a bind, I've found that some crushed
tortilla chips will thicken it up and give the same corn flavor as the
masa. You just have to cut back on the salt a bit in the original recipe
as the tortilla's will be quite salty.
lex
2005-02-01 07:50:39 UTC
Permalink
ground beef, worchestor,hot sause, tomato paste,
beans,onions,garlic,salt,cayenne pepper,diced tomatos and the secret
ingrediant...brown sugar...has won me numerous chili contests and
bring in mucho customers to my bars/grills


On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 09:46:28 -0800, "CincinnatiKid"
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
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Bolivar
2005-02-02 18:47:06 UTC
Permalink
First, check your supermarket and see if they have any Wick Fowler's
Chili Mix. It's based on his cookoff-winning recipe. -- I have yet to
come up with a better recipe.

If you can't find it, here's how I'd proceed (some of this is true even
if you're using Wick Fowler's ). The instructions are basically the
same he provides with his mix. The seasonings are close to what Fowler
uses.

* Meat: beef. Acceptable alternatives: bison, venison, elk. Anything
else isn't chili. Buy a naturally lean cut, about 2-3 pounds worth and
have it COARSE ground, or chop it yourself by hand into sugar-cube size
pieces. Ground meat tends to make milder chili, BTW. Good cuts are rump
roast and top sirloin.

* Brown the meat in your pot. If it gives off much fat, pour off the
fat before adding the rest of the stuff.

* Add a small onion, chopped fine, and a couple of minced garlic
cloves.
* Add an 8oz can of tomato sauce and 2 cans of water.
* Add the following spices: 1/4 cup dark chili powder, 1sp ground
oregano, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tbl paprika, salt to taste.

Cover and simmer slowly about 40 min, stirring occasionally.

Now add the hot pepper -- ground Cayenne pepper. That's where you'll
get the real heat. For this size recipe, about 1 or 2 tsp. This is also
the time to add a thickener if you want your chili thicker. My
preferred is "masa harina" (a special corn flour used in Mexican
cooking) made into a paste with some hot water -- about 2 tbl worth. If
you can't get that, then another alternative is to puree about a
half-can of chili beans or red kidney beans and stir that in.

Cover and simmer another half hour or so.

I like this recipe best when cooked the day before, but it's good right
away, too.

Bolivar
c***@chiliconcarnage.com
2005-02-03 02:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Dude;

do it the easy way:

a case of small Frito Lay fritos
a huge can of cheap hormel chili
a lot of shredded cheese
a lot of diced onion
a lot of diced Jalapeno
a huge bottle of Frank's Hot sauce
Beer

nuke the chili
put the diced stuff in some cups on the table
open the franks
open a bag of Fritos, pour in some chili, throw some diced stuff in it,
throw some cheese on top, soak it in Franks, get a beer.

Visit www.chiliconcarnage.com/hotshots.com for some drinks to go with
it.
fortknight
2005-02-04 01:58:25 UTC
Permalink
Here is a relatively easy and very good chili recipe...

1 package of pot roast
1 large can of tomato puree
1 large can of diced tomatoes
1 package of "california chili" (in spice section, or possibly hispanic
section of market).
1 large "sweet" onion
1 bottle of stout (guiness works)...
2 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
1/4 cup of oil

Cut pot roast into 1 inch cubes

In a large pot, put in oil and heat pat under moderately high heat. When
oil is hot, put meat cubes into the pot and let brown.

Chop onion.

Put both cans of tomatos in. Put in package of chili. Place in Onion
Stout, salt and pepper...

Put heat on low and let simmer for 4 hours. (It is done when the meat
transforms from chewy to melt in mouth).

Serve with fresh diced tomatos, onions, sour cream, and cheese for the
top, and rice, potato's or beans for underneath. Have Franks and Tabasco
on hand for adding your own heat at the end.

Oh, and like all good chili's and the like, hope there are leftovers,
cuz this is even better the day after...
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
________________________________________________________________________
* kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more.. www.recgroups.com
fortknight
2005-02-04 01:56:11 UTC
Permalink
Here is a relatively easy and very good chili recipe...

1 package of pot roast
1 large can of tomato puree
1 large can of diced tomatoes
1 package of "california chili" (in spice section, or possibly hispanic
section of market).
1 large "sweet" onion
1 bottle of stout (guiness works)...
2 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
1/4 cup of oil

Cut pot roast into 1 inch cubes

In a large pot, put in oil and heat pat under moderately high heat. When
oil is hot, put meat cubes into the pot and let brown.

Chop onion.

Put both cans of tomatos in. Put in package of chili. Place in Onion
Stout, salt and pepper...

Put heat on low and let simmer for 4 hours. (It is done when the meat
transforms from chewy to melt in mouth).

Serve with fresh diced tomatos, onions, sour cream, and cheese for the
top. Have Franks and Tabasco on hand for adding your own heat at the end.

Oh, and like all good chili's and the like, hope there are leftovers,
cuz this is even better the day after...
Post by CincinnatiKid
I'm hosting a Dinner Party this Saturday and our theme is Chili. Anyone
have a kick ass recipe they'd like to share?? I'm looking for a hot Chili
for the guys. Thanks.
________________________________________________________________________
* kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more.. www.recgroups.com
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