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Here are all the intimate details Amazon knows about us
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risky biz
2021-11-20 22:38:26 UTC
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'Here are all the intimate details Amazon knows about us

The company gathers a vast array of information on its US customers, and it started making that data available to all upon request early last year, after trying and failing to defeat a 2018 California measure requiring such disclosures. (US Amazon customers can obtain their data by filling out a form on Amazon.com.)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=GXPU3YPMBZQRWZK2&tag=nypost-20&asc_refurl=https://nypost.com/2021/11/19/a-look-at-the-intimate-details-amazon-knows-about-us/&asc_source=web

Seven Reuters reporters also obtained their Amazon files. The data reveals the company’s ability to amass strikingly intimate portraits of individual consumers.

Amazon collects data on consumers through its Alexa voice assistant, its e-commerce marketplace, Kindle e-readers, Audible audiobooks, its video and music platforms, home-security cameras and fitness trackers. Alexa-enabled devices make recordings inside people’s homes, and Ring security cameras capture every visitor.

Such information can reveal a person’s height, weight and health; their ethnicity (via clues contained in voice data) and political leanings; their reading and buying habits; their whereabouts on any given day, and sometimes whom they have met.

One reporter’s dossier revealed that Amazon had collected more than 90,000 Alexa recordings of family members between December 2017 and June 2021 – averaging about 70 daily. The recordings included details such as the names of the reporter’s young children and their favorite songs.

Amazon captured the children asking how they could convince their parents to let them “play,” and getting detailed instructions from Alexa on how to convince their parents to buy them video games. Be fully prepared, Alexa advised the kids, to refute common parent arguments such as “too violent,” “too expensive” and “you’re not doing well enough in school.” The information came from a third-party program used by Alexa called “wikiHow” that provides how-to advice from more than 180,000 articles, according to Amazon’s website.

Amazon said it does not own wikiHow, but that Alexa sometimes responds to requests with information from websites.

Some recordings involved conversations between family members using Alexa devices to communicate across different parts of the house. Several recordings captured children apologizing to their parents after being disciplined. Others picked up the children, ages 7, 9 and 12, asking Alexa questions about terms like “pansexual.”
In one recording, a child asks: “Alexa, what is a vagina?” In another: “Alexa, what does bondage mean?”

The reporter did not realize Amazon was storing the recordings before the company disclosed the data it tracked on the family.'
https://nypost.com/2021/11/19/a-look-at-the-intimate-details-amazon-knows-about-us/
VegasJerry
2021-11-21 18:47:57 UTC
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Post by risky biz
'Here are all the intimate details Amazon knows about us
The company gathers a vast array of information on its US customers, and it started making that data available to all upon request early last year, after trying and failing to defeat a 2018 California measure requiring such disclosures. (US Amazon customers can obtain their data by filling out a form on Amazon.com.)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=GXPU3YPMBZQRWZK2&tag=nypost-20&asc_refurl=https://nypost.com/2021/11/19/a-look-at-the-intimate-details-amazon-knows-about-us/&asc_source=web
Seven Reuters reporters also obtained their Amazon files. The data reveals the company’s ability to amass strikingly intimate portraits of individual consumers.
Amazon collects data on consumers through its Alexa voice assistant, its e-commerce marketplace, Kindle e-readers, Audible audiobooks, its video and music platforms, home-security cameras and fitness trackers. Alexa-enabled devices make recordings inside people’s homes, and Ring security cameras capture every visitor.
Such information can reveal a person’s height, weight and health; their ethnicity (via clues contained in voice data) and political leanings; their reading and buying habits; their whereabouts on any given day, and sometimes whom they have met.
One reporter’s dossier revealed that Amazon had collected more than 90,000 Alexa recordings of family members between December 2017 and June 2021 – averaging about 70 daily. The recordings included details such as the names of the reporter’s young children and their favorite songs.
Amazon captured the children asking how they could convince their parents to let them “play,” and getting detailed instructions from Alexa on how to convince their parents to buy them video games. Be fully prepared, Alexa advised the kids, to refute common parent arguments such as “too violent,” “too expensive” and “you’re not doing well enough in school.” The information came from a third-party program used by Alexa called “wikiHow” that provides how-to advice from more than 180,000 articles, according to Amazon’s website.
Amazon said it does not own wikiHow, but that Alexa sometimes responds to requests with information from websites.
Some recordings involved conversations between family members using Alexa devices to communicate across different parts of the house. Several recordings captured children apologizing to their parents after being disciplined. Others picked up the children, ages 7, 9 and 12, asking Alexa questions about terms like “pansexual.”
In one recording, a child asks: “Alexa, what is a vagina?” In another: “Alexa, what does bondage mean?”
The reporter did not realize Amazon was storing the recordings before the company disclosed the data it tracked on the family.'
https://nypost.com/2021/11/19/a-look-at-the-intimate-details-amazon-knows-about-us/
That ain’t nothing. There are three giant data companies that know ALL about you. Everything. When you use your credit card, the bank sells your billing to them. They know what you buy, what you pay, if you buy on sale, how soon after your payday, if you pay off or part pay your account, if you have a gun, how many guns, how much ammunition you buy, what magazines you buy, how often you travel and how far, where you shop, how far you’ll travel for sale items, your vehicle maintenance, where you travel with your phone and who you call, whether you respond to mail-in ads, what grocery stores you visit, and which products at the store and if you stay with that store on items they send you ads for, usually sending the add if you haven’t purchased a normal iten. Everything. (Now you know why your grocery stores have you use ‘loyalty cards’).

Another company has your photograph for facial recognition. And they have perfected facial recognition software, better than the FIB, including aging factors and partial facial. They go through Facebook and other sites, including DMV, and have you at least 15 times, at different angles with your name. They self-verify in case the same name is a different person. Because they gathered and store those images illegally, law enforcement cannot use them for facial recognition identification. (But police and FBI will use them illegally if all else fails). They charge like hell for their services because they are the best. Walk around downtown in any major city and that have you on facial recognition. Go through toll boothose, they have you and your car license.

And yea, Amazon sells this stuff to them, too.

FBI, CIA, NSA, Etc. and some police agencies (that have money) will use DNA Ancestry company (23 & Me, etc.) searches in companies that offer those services, but for ‘close matches;’ allowing them to investigate withing ‘families,’ for suspects. (Close counts in DNA searches). These companies say they block these agencies - for your security – but don’t believe it, they get paid.

When you mail a letter, you’re photographed in the post office. If you drop your letter in your corner mailbox, it’s picked up in order, by the box. When the postman delivers these letters to the post office, it’s entered in the sorter, still in order; mailbox by mailbox. Your letter is photographed, front and back. It’s read, sorted and the envelope marked with a sorting code. (You can - and I do - have a service that emails me, once a day, that (front) photograph of the letters that are on their way to me, that day. (This helps the PO if you send an anonymous letter or a letter with ‘powder’ in it. Or a bomb package; by looking at the photographs of the letters that were mailed next to yours, they narrow it to an individual box).

That’s why it’s a hoot when somebody whines about some little, “I want my privacy” item. Lol..
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